How the end of Windows XP affects your business

Transient

Microsoft will stop fixing the security issues of Windows XP and Office 2003 on April 8, 2014. What does that mean for you? Read on for excerpts and links for more information. Give us a call at 615-873-0387 or connect online to discuss the best solution for your business.


Some twelve-and-a-half years after Windows XP first went on sale, Microsoft is turning off support for the operating system. From 8 April there’ll be no further free updates or security patches.
— zdnet.com

What is end of support?

After 12 years, support for Windows XP will end on April 8, 2014. There will be no more security updates or technical support for the Windows XP operating system. It is very important that customers and partners migrate to a modern operating system.
— Microsoft.com

What does this mean?

It means you should take action. After April 8, 2014, Microsoft will no longer provide security updates or technical support for Windows XP. Security updates patch vulnerabilities that may be exploited by malware and help keep users and their data safer. PCs running Windows XP after April 8, 2014, should not be considered to be protected, and it is important that you migrate to a current supported operating system so you can receive regular security updates to protect their computer from malicious attacks.
— Microsoft.com

Potential risks of staying with Windows XP

Running Windows XP SP3 in your environment after April 8, 2104 may expose you to potential risks, such as:

Security:
Without critical Windows XP security updates, your PC may become vulnerable to harmful viruses, spyware, and other malicious software which can steal or damage your business data and information. Anti-virus software will also not be able to fully protect you once Windows XP itself is unsupported.

Compliance:
Businesses that are governed by regulatory obligations such as HIPAA may find that they are no longer able to satisfy compliance requirements. More information on HHS’s view on the security requirements for information systems that contain electronic protected health information (e-PHI) can be found here (HHS HIPAA FAQ - Security Rule).

Lack of Independent Software Vendor (ISV) Support:
Many software vendors will no longer support their products running on Windows XP as they are unable to receive Windows XP updates. For example, the new Office takes advantage of the modern Windows and will not run on Windows XP.

Hardware Manufacturer support:
Most PC hardware manufacturers will stop supporting Windows XP on existing and new hardware. This will also mean that drivers required to run Windows XP on new hardware may not be available.
— Microsoft.com
In fact, criminals may have been stashing away exploits to use once Microsoft has departed the scene, leaving the OS open to unpublished lines of attack.
— zdnet.com
The exploits that are already in these older browsers are fairly hideous. You’re talking about connecting a system that you could effectively sneeze on and get backdoor access. I would definitely be particularly cautious of the likes of internet-connected XP systems where it’s going to be very difficult to control the risks.”
— zdnet.com